On-Site Courses

Summer 2017 Courses 

Module 1: June 19-July 7th

Theo 60898 Christology: Early and Medieval 
S. Colberg/Heintz
The question posed to his disciples by Jesus, "Who do you say that I am" elicited in the course of subsequent history not only a diversity of responses, but also significant debate and theological reflection. Focusing on primary texts from the early (Patristic) and Medieval periods, this course will examine how the living tradition of the Church came to express its conviction in the Lordship of Jesus Christ.

Theo 60222: Christian Doctrine for Catechists
J. Cavadini
This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church: The Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism, but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines.

Theo 60819: Christianity & World Religions
B. Malkovsky
This course is designed to introduce you to the basic teachings and spiritualties of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. We will approach these religions both historically and theologically, seeking to determine where they converge and differ from Christianity on such perennial issues as death, meaning, the nature of the ultimate Mystery, the overcoming of suffering etc. That is to say, we will not only attempt to comprehend these religions according to their own self-understanding, but we will also endeavor to appraise their significance in relation to Christian faith, both in the challenge and enrichment they present. We will also examine some traditional and contemporary Catholic and Protestant approaches to the truth claims of other religions. Our own search to know how the truth and experience of other faiths are related to Christian faith will be guided by the insights of important Christian contemplatives who have entered deeply into the spirituality of other traditions. By course end we ought to have a greater understanding of what is essential to Christian faith and practice, as well as a greater appreciation of the spiritual paths of others. This course is especially recommended as a preparation for teaching high school and introductory university-level courses.

Theo 60177: New Testament Theology
D. Lincicum
Does the New Testament evince a coherent theology, or does the plurality of the witnesses preclude such a unified view? This course is intended to provide an opportunity for students to grapple with major debates about the nature of the theology of the New Testament. In addition to considering the discrete contributions of the major corpora of the New Testament, time will be devoted to the history of the discipline and the views of some of its major proponents.

Theo 6080: Ecclesiology Syllabus
K. Colberg
This course examines the development of the Church from both theological and historical perspectives. It seeks to assist students in constructing and refining critical principles of interpretation that apply directly to the mystery, mission, ministries and structure of the Church. Of central concern are the questions of how the Church has understood its mission at various points in its history and what developments have impacted this understanding. Strong emphasis is placed on the theological developments that have occurred before, during and after the Second Vatican Council as these periods saw critical development in the Church's self-understanding. This is a core course.

Theo 60425: Mary & the Saints Syllabus
M. Johnson 
This course explores the evolution and theology of Mary and the saints in their liturgical and doctrinal expressions in an attempt to discern, evaluate, and articulate their proper place within Christian liturgy, doctrine, and life today in relationship to the central mediatorial role of Christ. Issues of popular piety, "models of holiness," and ecumenical division, dialogue, convergence, feminist critique, and liturgical renewal will also be examined. Requirements include several short papers/seminar-style presentations, and a research paper.

Theo 60656: Penance: Sacramental & Social
M. Griffin
In this course we will explore the practice of penance in Catholic tradition, attending particularly to its implications for contemporary efforts for social justice and peace. We will begin historically, tracing the development of the sacrament from the early church to the present day. In this section of the course, liturgical theology will be key in looking at changes over the centuries to how the sacrament is enacted in the church. The second section of the course will examine systematic theological reflection on the concept of penance itself. What is penance, what are its elements, how does it reflect the dynamics of nature and grace? Central here will be the work of Thomas Aquinas and his interpreters. The final section of the course will examine three concrete issues of contemporary significance. Criminal Justice reform, truth and reconciliation after political violence, and the return of soldiers from war. For each of these issues, we will discuss how the concept of penance can play a fruitful role in advancing new solutions to difficult challenges.

Theo 60848: Theological Integration
J. Poorman 
(ECHO second-year participants only.) This course represents a continuation of Theology 60847 and is designed to assist apprentice catechetical leaders in the ECHO/Faith Formation Leadership Program in their ongoing integration of theological studies and professional ministerial praxis. Having completed a full academic year of parish ministry, participants nurture their emerging ministerial identities and skills while utilizing class sessions for advanced work in theological reflection based on case study method and for seminar facilitation of conversation on theological topics pertinent to catechetical leadership in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to deepened exploration of ministerial skills and processes emphasized during their first year in ECHO, participants engage in facilitated appropriation of leadership skills such as ministerial collaboration, mutual empowerment, delegation, community building, conflict resolution, volunteer management, parish needs assessment, and effective pastoral communication. Relationship between Christology and Pneumatology in the Writings of Yves Congar, Karl Rahner and Jacques Dupuis, PUG, 1987.

Module 2: July 10-28th

Theo 60893: Teaching Theology Syllabus
T. Walatka
This course will provide an introduction to pedagogy for theological educators. The primary focus of the course will be on a) the vocation of teaching theology and b) basic pedagogical principles for the theology classroom. Students will engage educational and sociological research relevant to teaching high school theology and learn pedagogical techniques which build upon this research. Much of the class will be spent working through how to teach key doctrinal moments in the U.S. Catholic Bishops' High School Curriculum Framework in a pedagogically effective manner.

Theo 60286: Christian Spirituality
J. DeFrancis
This course will introduce students to the Christian spiritual tradition, that is, the ways that followers of Jesus have, in the course of history, sought to make sense out of what it means to be a disciple, what difference prayer makes, what defines the contours of a Christian life, how this is worked out within the life of the Church, and what holiness might look like. Through the reading of primary texts, some well-known, others more obscure, students will glimpse how these various questions were answered in particular moments, junctures, or contexts within the Christian theological tradition, c. 100 - 1500 AD

Theo 60894: Intro to Catechetical Theology Syllabus
T. O'Malley
This course provides an introduction to the theological principles undergirding the ministry of catechesis. In the first week of the course, we devote significant attention to a theology of revelation grounded in the pedagogy of God. In the second week, we attend to the philosophical and theological foundations of contemporary approaches to catechesis and religious education. In the last week, we develop pedagogical strategies for forming Christians in the liturgical, moral, and spiritual tasks of catechesis.

Theo 60655: Moral Theology of Pope Francis
A. Dolcich-Ashley
Pope Francis has emerged as one of the most well-known of the world’s personalities because of his simplicity, closeness to the vulnerable and poor, and advocacy for reforms within the Catholic Church. This course will examine Pope Francis? unique contributions to and applications of Catholic moral theology which themselves draw on traditions of Christian spirituality, his participation in the modern Latin American context, and his discernment of moral concerns throughout the Catholic Church globally. We will study official papal (2013-present) and episcopal statements (1992-2013) and compare them with analogues from Popes Benedict XVI and St John Paul II. In addition, we will understand Pope Francis’s place in the trajectory of Catholic moral theology of the post-Vatican II period.

Theo 60848: Theological Integration
J. Poorman 
(ECHO second-year participants only.) This course represents a continuation of Theology 60847 and is designed to assist apprentice catechetical leaders in the ECHO/Faith Formation Leadership Program in their ongoing integration of theological studies and professional ministerial praxis. Having completed a full academic year of parish ministry, participants nurture their emerging ministerial identities and skills while utilizing class sessions for advanced work in theological reflection based on case study method and for seminar facilitation of conversation on theological topics pertinent to catechetical leadership in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to deepened exploration of ministerial skills and processes emphasized during their first year in ECHO, participants engage in facilitated appropriation of leadership skills such as ministerial collaboration, mutual empowerment, delegation, community building, conflict resolution, volunteer management, parish needs assessment, and effective pastoral communication. Relationship between Christology and Pneumatology in the Writings of Yves Congar, Karl Rahner and Jacques Dupuis, PUG, 1987.

Theo 60833: Christian- Muslim Relations Syllabus
G. Reynolds
In our course we will consider Christianity's encounter with Islam, from the Islamic conquests of the 7th century to the internet age. The first section of the course is historical. We will examine how various historical contexts have affected the Christian understanding of Muslims and Islam, from the lifetime of the Prophet Muhammad to September 11 and beyond. The second section of the course is systematic. How are Christians today to respond to Islam, in light of recent world events and recent Church teaching? In addressing this question we will analyze primary theological sources that express a range of responses, from pluralism to dialogue to evangelism. Students in this class will be introduced to the Quran, to the life of Muhammad, to the difference between Sunni and Shi'ite Islam, to Church teaching on Christianity's relationship with Islam, and to trends in the theology of religions. Previous knowledge of Islam or Islamic Studies is not necessary for this course.

Theo 60462: Liturgical Theology of the Eucharist Syllabus
D. Fagerberg 
This course will focus on the Eucharist as a way into liturgical theology. We will examine the historical structure and content of the Eucharistic liturgy, and from there proceed into reflecting upon various theological doctrines. That is, we will connect liturgical life with theological truths like divinization, transubstantiation, sacrifice, priesthood of baptized and ordained, eschatology, etc. We will conclude by seeing how the lex orandi of the church's Eucharist establishes the lex credendi of Church teaching, and ecclesial ministries of catechesis and evangelization.

Hybrid and Intensive seminars or Exams

Theo 60178: Theology of the Hebrew Bible in its Ancient Near Eastern Context (meets July 10-21)
A. Winitzer

Theo 68803: MA Capstone Course: Mercy
(5 weeks online, 1 week residential)
M. Ashley

Theo 68802: Comprehensive Exam/Review
C. Cavadini 

Questions about Courses and Syllabi? The syllabus for each course will be posted as they are received on the MA Theology web page. View the Summer Classes 2017 Tentative Schedule. Students are responsible to read all required readings before arriving to campus in the summer. For questions please contact Margaret McVeigh, Administrative Coordinator for the M.A. Program at 574.631.4256 or by email at margaret.mcveigh@nd.edu.