Summer 2019

Summer 2019

Module 1 - June 17th - July 6th

THEO60222: Christian Doctrine for Catechists

J. Cavadini

This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism, but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines. Elective - 3 credits

THEO60884: Trinity & Christian Salvation

S. Colberg, M. Heintz

A famous 20th Century theologian wrote that, "despite their orthodox confession of the Trinity, Christians are, in their practical life, almost mere ?monotheists'." By implication, this would mean that "in their practical life", Christians are not typically in the habit of actually practicing Christianity, since the Christian faith is irreducibly Trinitarian. No study of the Trinity can be strictly removed from the life of faith, and the life of faith for the Christian is ordered to the Persons of the Trinity. This course therefore pursues the contours and the content of the Christian doctrine of God, tracing its developments over the centuries and examining how it is made manifest the Christian life of prayer, liturgy and sacrament, and charity. Since Jesus Christ is at once the revelation of God to man and of man to himself, Christological studies will take a central role in our work. In sum, this course equips and challenges students to grapple with the mystery of St. Paul's teaching that, for the Christian, your life is hidden with Christ in God (Col. 3:3). Core - 3 credits

THEO60806: Ecclesiology

K. Colberg

This course examines the development of the Church from both theological and historical perspectives. It seeks to assist students in constructing and refining critical principles of interpretation that apply directly to the mystery, mission, ministries and structure of the Church. Of central concern are the questions of how the Church has understood its mission at various points in its history and what developments have impacted this understanding. Strong emphasis is placed on the theological developments that have occurred before, during and after the Second Vatican Council as these periods saw critical development in the Church's self-understanding. Core - 3 credits

THEO60659: Building a Culture of Life Pro-Life in a Throw-Away Culture

C. Camosy

Exasperated complaints about a polarized US culture have now become something close to a cliche. And though our national political culture is indeed more polarized than at any time since Civil War Reconstruction, there are hopeful signs that the vast majority of US Americans cannot be sorted this way - especially when focusing on their underlying values rather than public policy. This course names a growing edge of the pro-life movement - resisting throw-away culture with a culture of encounter, hospitality and mercy - as, among other things, a tool that can highlight and grow a hopeful overlapping consensus. Topics like sexual violence, abortion, welcoming migrants, assisting in medical suicides, and even treatment of non-human animals will be viewed through a lens of a consistent life ethic. Focusing on how Pope Francis has built on the work of Cardinal Bernadrin, St. John Paul II and Benedict XVI, the course will suggest that our moment of political confusion and realignment provides a golden opportunity for faithful Christians to (re)enter political discourse without choosing between authenticity and effectiveness. - Elective - 3 credits

One of the reading requirements Resisting Throwaway Culture can be pre-ordered here

 

THEO60848: Theological Integration (ECHO Program or w/Departmental Approval)

J. Poorman

(ECHO second-year participants only.) This course represents a continuation of Theology 60847 and is designed to assist apprentice catechetical leaders in the ECHO/Faith Formation Leadership Program in their ongoing integration of theological studies and professional ministerial praxis. Having completed a full academic year of parish ministry, participants nurture their emerging ministerial identities and skills while utilizing class sessions for advanced work in theological reflection based on case study method and for seminar facilitation of conversation on theological topics pertinent to catechetical leadership in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to deepened exploration of ministerial skills and processes emphasized during their first year in ECHO, participants engage in facilitated appropriation of leadership skills such as ministerial collaboration, mutual empowerment, delegation, community building, conflict resolution, volunteer management, parish needs assessment, and effective pastoral communication. Relationship between Christology and Pneumatology in the Writings of Yves Congar, Karl Rahner and Jacques Dupuis, PUG, 1987. ECHO 15 - 3 credits

 

Module 2 - July 8th - July 26th

THEO60859: Medieval Mysticism

J. DeFrancis

This course examines the intersection of Christology and spirituality in the spiritual masters of the medieval tradition. Who is Jesus? What has he done? How can theological accounts of Christ's Person and saving work deepen our life in the Spirit of Christ? And, conversely, how has the spiritual experience of the great medieval mystics contributed to our deeper understanding Jesus? Special attention will be given to St. Bernard of Clairvaux and the Cistercian tradition, the Franciscan and Dominican traditions, and women mystics including Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch, Mechtild of Magdeburg, and Catherine of Siena. - Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60462: Liturgical Theology of the Eucharist

D. Fagerberg

This course will focus on the Eucharist as a way into liturgical theology. We will examine the historical structure and content of the Eucharistic liturgy, and from there proceed into reflecting upon various theological doctrines. That is, we will connect liturgical life with theological truths like divinization, transubstantiation, sacrifice, priesthood of baptized and ordained, eschatology, etc. We will conclude by seeing how the lex orandi of the church's Eucharist establishes the lex credendi of Church teaching, and ecclesial ministries of catechesis and evangelization. Core - 3 credits

 

THEO60894: Intro to Catachetical Theology

T. O’Malley

This course provides an introduction to the theological principles undergirding the ministry of catechesis. In the first week of the course, we devote significant attention to a theology of revelation grounded in the pedagogy of God. In the second week, we attend to the philosophical and theological foundations of contemporary approaches to catechesis and religious education. In the last week, we develop pedagogical strategies for forming Christians in the liturgical, moral, and spiritual tasks of catechesis. Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60848: Theological Integration (ECHO Program or w/ Departmental Approval)

J. Poorman

(ECHO second-year participants only.) This course represents a continuation of Theology 60847 and is designed to assist apprentice catechetical leaders in the ECHO/Faith Formation Leadership Program in their ongoing integration of theological studies and professional ministerial praxis. Having completed a full academic year of parish ministry, participants nurture their emerging ministerial identities and skills while utilizing class sessions for advanced work in theological reflection based on case study method and for seminar facilitation of conversation on theological topics pertinent to catechetical leadership in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to deepened exploration of ministerial skills and processes emphasized during their first year in ECHO, participants engage in facilitated appropriation of leadership skills such as ministerial collaboration, mutual empowerment, delegation, community building, conflict resolution, volunteer management, parish needs assessment, and effective pastoral communication. Relationship between Christology and Pneumatology in the Writings of Yves Congar, Karl Rahner and Jacques Dupuis, PUG, 1987. ECHO 15 - 3 credits

 

THEO60183: New Testament Topic; Pauline Soteriology

Fr. G. Tatum

The purpose of this course is to restore his real personality to Paul, who is most often understood as fountain of theological ideas. This will involve a somewhat detailed reconstruction of the world in which he lived, with specific concern for the influences that formed him, and the controversies that forced him to think more deeply. His letters will be studied in the order in which they were written with a view to dating and explaining the emergence of his key theological ideas. The required readings are: J. Murphy-O'Connor, Paul. A Critical Life (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996). Paperback edition ISBN 0-19-285342-2. The Cambridge Companion to St Paul (ed. J.D.G. Dunn; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). Paperback edition ISBN 0-521-78694-0.  Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60893: Teaching Theology

C. Kilbane, W. Mattison

This course will provide an introduction to pedagogy for theological educators. The primary focus of the course will be on a) the vocation of teaching theology and b) basic pedagogical principles for the theology classroom. Students will engage educational and sociological research relevant to teaching high school theology and learn pedagogical techniques which build upon this research. Much of the class will be spent working through how to teach key doctrinal moments in the U.S. Catholic Bishops' High School Curriculum Framework in a pedagogically effective manner. Elective - 3 credits

 

Hybrid & Intensive Seminars or Exams

THEO60901: Symposia Course: The Domestic Church

T. O’Malley

2019 Topic: Liturgy and the Domestic Church. The term "domestic Church" is not simply a metaphor employed to speak about the Christian family. Rather, the family should become an icon of what the Church is called to be in Jesus Christ'a communion of mutual love. Families have a vocation to become this communion of love, and the liturgical life of the Church has an integral role to play in this formation. In this hybrid course, affiliated with the McGrath Institute for Church Life's annual Liturgy Week (June 17-20, 2019), students will discover the integral link between liturgy and the domestic Church. Topics to be addressed by Liturgy Week faculty include the history of liturgical prayer in the home; a sociological account of the contemporary family; the relationship between liturgy, ethics, and family life; pastoral observations about the state of the family in the American Church; a liturgical theology of marriage and family; and methods for conducting sacramental formation in family life. - Elective - Hybrid, 3 credits

 

May 20th - June 27th

THEO68803: MA Capstone - Mercy

M. Ashley

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies. Core - Hybrid, 3 credits

 

May 20th - June 26th

THEO68803: MA Capstone - Creation

A. Pagliarini/ C. Cavadini

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies. Core - Hybrid, 3 credits