Spring 2019 / Summer 2019

Spring 2019 Courses

THEO64286-01: Qur'an's Relation to the Bible

G.  Reynolds
To most Muslims the Qur'an is the eternal, uncreated Word of God. For them the Qur'an is not an inspired scripture like the Bible. Instead it is like Christ: a divine Word descended from heaven. It is perfect in regard to its literary qualities, its accounts of nations and prophets, and its scientific references. Islamic reverence for the Qur'an is seen in the way Muslims kiss the book before opening it, and are careful never to place another book on top of it. From the perspective of academic scholars, however, the Qur'an is a poorly understood text. Scholars are divided over the precise historical context in which the Qur'an emerged, its connection to the life of Muhammad, and its relation to the Bible and other religious literature. In this course we will examine the Qur'an itself, traditional Islamic teaching on the Qur'an, and academic controversies over the Qur'an. In addition we will examine the connection of the Qur'an to Christian theology. Indeed it should be remembered that the Qur'an is fundamentally concerned with the great figures of Biblical tradition, including Abraham, Moses, Mary, and Jesus. Moreover, the Qur'an repeatedly refutes Christian doctrine. Thus it is an important text for anyone interested in the relationship between Islam and Christianity, or the relations between Muslims and Christians, in past centuries or in our age. Elective - Online, 3 credits

 

THEO64408-01: Sacraments

K. Mahon

Lumen Gentium says that in the Church "the life of Christ is poured into the believers who, through the sacraments, are united in a hidden and real way to Christ who suffered and was glorified." This course will look at the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church as the means whereby Christians are mystically united to the life of Christ. We will consider questions concerning the development of each rite, but the main focus of attention is on the theological dimensions of each sacrament. We will begin with a liturgical theology of sacraments; we will next look at each of the seven sacraments individually; and we will look at the patristic and scholastic theologies by considering biblical typology and scholastic vocabulary. This is a totally on-line course. You should have good network connection, be comfortable uploading/downloading files, and watching videos online. We will follow a cycle of video lecture, reading, and writing (occasionally a group forum). It will cover the same amount of material as if you were on campus, so deadlines will be required weekly so no one falls behind. Core - Online, 3 credits

 

February 1 & 2, March 22 & 23, April 26 & 27, Oral Exam May 6-10

Ft. Wayne, IN 

THEO64209-01: Contemplation and Action

M. Ashley

This course explores the interactions between Christian spirituality and systematic theology, with a focus on the relationship between prayer and action in a Christian's spiritual life. The tendency in the Christian tradition has been to see prayer as superior to action, since it is in prayer (and contemplative prayer in particular) that one experiences in this life (however fragmentarily) that union with God that is our destiny in the next. However, there have been innovative attempts in the history of the tradition to break down overly rigid barriers between these two essential components of the Christian spiritual journey. We begin in Greek thought, with the distinction between theoria and praxis. We then consider how this conceptual pair was taken over in the history of Christian spirituality in some classic understandings of the relationship between the vita contemplativa and the vita activa. Figures in this section will include Augustine, Bernard of Clairvaux, Thomas Aquinas, Meister Eckhart and Catherine of Siena. This part of the course will culminate in the innovative sixteenth century approaches to this question by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross. Then we will look at three modern figures who have attempted to interrelate contemplation and action: Thomas Merton, Gustavo Gutierrez and Dorothy Day. Elective – Ft. Wayne, 3 credits

 

December 29, 2018 -  January 6, 2019 

Tucson, AZ

THEO64289-01: Spirituality of the Church

J. DeFrancis

"All of us who have received one and the same Spirit, that is, the Holy Spirit, are in a sense blended together with one another and with God. For if Christ, together with the Father's and his own Spirit, comes to dwell in each of us, though we are many, still the Spirit is one and undivided. He binds together the spirits of each and every one of us - and makes all appear as one in him" (Cyril of Alexandria, In Jo. ev.11, 11, qtd. In CCC 738). This course examines the relationship between spirituality - Christian life in the Spirit - and ecclesiology - the study of the mystery of the Church. We will be guided by a unifying question: what difference does it make that God chooses to make us holy not as individuals, but as one people, a people which acknowledges him in truth and serves him in holiness (Lumen Gentium9)? In other words, does it practically matter to me that I am called to live out my unique vocation in and through the Church, the Mystical Body of Christ and Temple of the Holy Spirit? Our inquiry will be nourished by the great ecclesial texts of Scripture, the Church Fathers, and the magisterium, most especially the Vatican II's Lumen Gentium. The unique Tucson learning experience, with its emphasis on shared study, meals, prayer, and common participation in the Church's liturgy, will undoubtedly be a great aide to us in this specifically ecclesial inquiry. Elective – Tucson, AZ, 3 credits

 

Summer 2019

Module 1 - June 17th - July 6th

THEO60222: Christian Doctrine for Catechists

J. Cavadini

This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism, but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines. Elective - 3 credits

THEO60884: Trinity & Christian Salvation

S. Colberg, M. Heintz

A famous 20th Century theologian wrote that, "despite their orthodox confession of the Trinity, Christians are, in their practical life, almost mere ?monotheists'." By implication, this would mean that "in their practical life", Christians are not typically in the habit of actually practicing Christianity, since the Christian faith is irreducibly Trinitarian. No study of the Trinity can be strictly removed from the life of faith, and the life of faith for the Christian is ordered to the Persons of the Trinity. This course therefore pursues the contours and the content of the Christian doctrine of God, tracing its developments over the centuries and examining how it is made manifest the Christian life of prayer, liturgy and sacrament, and charity. Since Jesus Christ is at once the revelation of God to man and of man to himself, Christological studies will take a central role in our work. In sum, this course equips and challenges students to grapple with the mystery of St. Paul's teaching that, for the Christian, your life is hidden with Christ in God (Col. 3:3). Core - 3 credits

THEO60806: Ecclesiology

K. Colberg

This course examines the development of the Church from both theological and historical perspectives. It seeks to assist students in constructing and refining critical principles of interpretation that apply directly to the mystery, mission, ministries and structure of the Church. Of central concern are the questions of how the Church has understood its mission at various points in its history and what developments have impacted this understanding. Strong emphasis is placed on the theological developments that have occurred before, during and after the Second Vatican Council as these periods saw critical development in the Church's self-understanding. Core - 3 credits

THEO : Pro-Life Ethics in a Throw-Away Culture

C. Camosy

Course description coming soon - Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60848: Theological Integration (ECHO Program or w/Departmental Approval)

J. Poorman

(ECHO second-year participants only.) This course represents a continuation of Theology 60847 and is designed to assist apprentice catechetical leaders in the ECHO/Faith Formation Leadership Program in their ongoing integration of theological studies and professional ministerial praxis. Having completed a full academic year of parish ministry, participants nurture their emerging ministerial identities and skills while utilizing class sessions for advanced work in theological reflection based on case study method and for seminar facilitation of conversation on theological topics pertinent to catechetical leadership in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to deepened exploration of ministerial skills and processes emphasized during their first year in ECHO, participants engage in facilitated appropriation of leadership skills such as ministerial collaboration, mutual empowerment, delegation, community building, conflict resolution, volunteer management, parish needs assessment, and effective pastoral communication. Relationship between Christology and Pneumatology in the Writings of Yves Congar, Karl Rahner and Jacques Dupuis, PUG, 1987. ECHO 15 - 3 credits

 

Module 2 - July 8th - July 26th

THEO : Medieval Mysticism

J. DeFrancis

Course description coming soon - Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60462: Liturgical Theology of the Eucharist

D. Fagerberg

This course will focus on the Eucharist as a way into liturgical theology. We will examine the historical structure and content of the Eucharistic liturgy, and from there proceed into reflecting upon various theological doctrines. That is, we will connect liturgical life with theological truths like divinization, transubstantiation, sacrifice, priesthood of baptized and ordained, eschatology, etc. We will conclude by seeing how the lex orandi of the church's Eucharist establishes the lex credendi of Church teaching, and ecclesial ministries of catechesis and evangelization. Core - 3 credits

 

THEO60894: Intro to Catachetical Theology

T. O’Malley

This course provides an introduction to the theological principles undergirding the ministry of catechesis. In the first week of the course, we devote significant attention to a theology of revelation grounded in the pedagogy of God. In the second week, we attend to the philosophical and theological foundations of contemporary approaches to catechesis and religious education. In the last week, we develop pedagogical strategies for forming Christians in the liturgical, moral, and spiritual tasks of catechesis. Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60848: Theological Integration (ECHO Program or w/ Departmental Approval)

J. Poorman

(ECHO second-year participants only.) This course represents a continuation of Theology 60847 and is designed to assist apprentice catechetical leaders in the ECHO/Faith Formation Leadership Program in their ongoing integration of theological studies and professional ministerial praxis. Having completed a full academic year of parish ministry, participants nurture their emerging ministerial identities and skills while utilizing class sessions for advanced work in theological reflection based on case study method and for seminar facilitation of conversation on theological topics pertinent to catechetical leadership in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to deepened exploration of ministerial skills and processes emphasized during their first year in ECHO, participants engage in facilitated appropriation of leadership skills such as ministerial collaboration, mutual empowerment, delegation, community building, conflict resolution, volunteer management, parish needs assessment, and effective pastoral communication. Relationship between Christology and Pneumatology in the Writings of Yves Congar, Karl Rahner and Jacques Dupuis, PUG, 1987. ECHO 15 - 3 credits

 

THEO60114: New Testament Topic; Paul’s Soteriology

Fr. G. Tatum

The purpose of this course is to restore his real personality to Paul, who is most often understood as fountain of theological ideas. This will involve a somewhat detailed reconstruction of the world in which he lived, with specific concern for the influences that formed him, and the controversies that forced him to think more deeply. His letters will be studied in the order in which they were written with a view to dating and explaining the emergence of his key theological ideas. The required readings are: J. Murphy-O'Connor, Paul. A Critical Life (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996). Paperback edition ISBN 0-19-285342-2. The Cambridge Companion to St Paul (ed. J.D.G. Dunn; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). Paperback edition ISBN 0-521-78694-0.  Elective - 3 credits

 

THEO60893: Teaching Theology

T. Walatka

This course will provide an introduction to pedagogy for theological educators. The primary focus of the course will be on a) the vocation of teaching theology and b) basic pedagogical principles for the theology classroom. Students will engage educational and sociological research relevant to teaching high school theology and learn pedagogical techniques which build upon this research. Much of the class will be spent working through how to teach key doctrinal moments in the U.S. Catholic Bishops' High School Curriculum Framework in a pedagogically effective manner. Elective - 3 credits

 

Hybrid & Intensive Seminars or Exams

THEO : Symposia Course: The Domestic Church

T. O’Malley

Course description coming soon - Elective - Hybrid, 3 credits

 

THEO : “Telling the Stories of Saints: Catherine of Siena, Joan of Arc, and Bernadette”

C. Cavadini

Course description coming soon - Elective - Online, 3 credits

 

May 20th - June 27th

THEO68803: MA Capstone - Mercy

M. Ashley

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies. Core - Hybrid, 3 credits

 

May 20th - June 26th

THEO68803: MA Capstone - Creation

A. Pagliarini/ C. Cavadini

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies. Core - Hybrid, 3 credits