Summer 2021

Summer 2021
(May 24 - July 23)

Online Courses

THEO64222: Apologetics of Love
Professor: J. Cavadini
Description: 
This online course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism , but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. With regard to the student's facility in learning to teach the materials, the course focuses on an Apologetics of Love, based largely on the work of Joseph Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines. (elective)

THEO604216: Telling the Stories of Saints
Professor: C. Cavadini
Description: 
Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI has said that the two greatest evangelical tools we have are the Arts and the Saints. This course examines the lives of the saints and the way their stories have been told through the ages. Part of our larger goal, then, will be retrieving this particular art of storytelling. Students will be asked not only to read the lives of the saints, but to write the life of a saint, too. In order to examine these stories most fully, we will spend time thinking about topics such as scriptural exegesis, martyrdom, relics, the communion of saints, medieval legends, art, and modern vitae or novels. (elective)

THEO60901: Symposia on Evangelization & Media 
Professor: B. Robinson
Description:
 On campus portion - June 16-19
2021 Topic: Evangelization and Media. The Church's mission to evangelize the world has not changed in over 2000 years. What has changed are the means by which the faith is proclaimed across time and cultures. In this hybrid course, students will consider the ways in which new cultural forms of communication have both enhanced and inhibited evangelization efforts. From ancient preaching to the letters of Saint Paul, from medieval manuscripts to the artistic triumphs of the Renaissance, and from mass media to social media, the relationship between faith, culture and communication has a long and important history. This course will consider the ways in which historical forms of communication have converged in digital culture and how pastoral leaders can overcome the contradiction between preaching an incarnate religion in an increasingly disembodied digital world. After a 4-week online course, students will travel to Notre Dame to meet with a cohort of pastoral leaders in the McGrath Institute for Church Life's "Church Communications Ecology Program" (June 16-19, 2021). Together they will discuss contemporary issues in evangelization and explore the Notre Dame campus and its various media of evangelization, from the stained glass windows of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart to the state of the art Martin Media Center. (elective)

THEO68803-01: MA Capstone - Mercy (non-Echo students)
June 21-23
T. Walatka
This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies. - Core - Hybrid, (5 weeks online-spring, 1 week-summer residential 6/21-6/24)

THEO68803-02: MA Capstone - Creation (Echo students)
June 21-23
C. Cavadini 
This course draws upon students' experiences in the classroom and in their apprenticeships. Based on Ratzinger's Introduction to Christianity student will write academic papers exploring how to "introduce" various topics in Christian Theology. Presentations will be made in the final week. - Core - Hybrid, (5 weeks online-spring, 1 week-summer residential 6/21-6/24)

In Person Courses

Module 1 (June 14 - July 2)

THEO60601: Foundations of Moral Theology
Professor: W. Mattison
Description: 
This course introduces the history and patterns of thought that provide the foundations for contemporary discussions about moral theology in the Roman Catholic Church. Its central aim will be to position moral theology as a practical and pastoral expression of Christian faith, but also as a tradition of inquiry relevant to wider discussions about moral matters. Topics to be considered include: sources for moral theology, genres of moral writing, the nature of the human person and her relationship to the community of disciples, the dynamics of moral action, and the topics of freedom, experience, authority, virtue, and forgiveness. Course requirements include two short reflection papers and a final research paper, which may be customized to students' own ongoing pastoral and/or academic questions. (required)

THEO60884: Trinity & Christian Salvation
Professor: S. Colberg, M. Heintz
Description:
A famous 20th Century theologian wrote that, "despite their orthodox confession of the Trinity, Christians are, in their practical life, almost mere ?monotheists'." By implication, this would mean that "in their practical life", Christians are not typically in the habit of actually practicing Christianity, since the Christian faith is irreducibly Trinitarian. No study of the Trinity can be strictly removed from the life of faith, and the life of faith for the Christian is ordered to the Persons of the Trinity. This course therefore pursues the contours and the content of the Christian doctrine of God, tracing its developments over the centuries and examining how it is made manifest the Christian life of prayer, liturgy and sacrament, and charity. Since Jesus Christ is at once the revelation of God to man and of man to himself, Christological studies will take a central role in our work. In sum, this course equips and challenges students to grapple with the mystery of St. Paul's teaching that, for the Christian, your life is hidden with Christ in God (Col. 3:3). (required)

THEO60806: Ecclesiology
Professor: K. Colberg
Description: 
This course examines the development of the Church from both theological and historical perspectives. It seeks to assist students in constructing and refining critical principles of interpretation that apply directly to the mystery, mission, ministries and structure of the Church. Of central concern are the questions of how the Church has understood its mission at various points in its history and what developments have impacted this understanding. Strong emphasis is placed on the theological developments that have occurred before, during and after the Second Vatican Council as these periods saw critical development in the Church's self-understanding. (required)

THEO60250: Intro to the Early Church
Professor: J. McManaway
Description:
The passage of many centuries since the birth of Christianity may sometimes have the effect of dulling our appreciation of how pressing the questions facing the early Church were. How does our faith relate to Judaism? Are the Scriptures of Israel truly the Word of God? How should we view the secular state and secular learning? These and other questions were worked out in a rich context of expressed Christian identity: a developing canon of Sacred Scripture, liturgical worship, a sense of moral difference and evangelical mission. Early Christian communities produced colorful and compelling figures such as clergy, prophets, laypeople, apologists, martyrs, and monastics. At the heart of it all lies the ultimate question: the figure of Jesus himself, who claimed to enjoy a unique filial relationship with the God of Israel. The quest for adequate ways of speaking about this relationship, which forms the generative center of Christian faith, gave rise to the great Christological and Trinitarian debates of the fourth and fifth centuries. The course will seek an understanding of these debates not as dry, rarefied, academic quarrels, but as issues of great moment for Christian self-understanding. (elective)

THEO60894: Art of Catechesis
Professor: T. O'Malley
Description: 
In this course, students will be introduced to the art of catechesis as a sacramental and aesthetic ministry within the Church. In the first week of the course, students will learn the major principles governing the ministry of catechesis as related to a participation in divine Revelation. They will also read chief classics in catechesis within the history of Christianity. After this introduction, the course will be structured around the experience of education as described by Luigi Giussani. How does the catechist provoke the student to encounter the living God? How does the catechist introduce the student to the ultimate hypothesis at the heart of Christianity? And how does the catechist initiate students into practices within a community of faith that allow for the verification of the Gospel in one?s life? In answering each of these questions, the students will deepen their theoretical and practical capacity to function as a catechist within the Church. In the final week, students will consider the Catholic school as a place of evangelization, focused on the intellectual formation of the students. Here, readings will be centered on a Catholic philosophy and theology of education. (elective)

THEO60893: Teaching Theology
Professor: T. Walatka
Description: 
This course will provide an introduction to pedagogy for theological educators. The primary focus of the course will be on a) the vocation of teaching theology and b) basic pedagogical principles for the theology classroom. Students will engage educational and sociological research relevant to teaching high school theology and learn pedagogical techniques which build upon this research. Much of the class will be spent working through how to teach key doctrinal moments in the U.S. Catholic Bishops' High School Curriculum Framework in a pedagogically effective manner. (elective)

Module 2 (July 5 - 23)

THEO60222: Christian Doctrine for Catechists
Professor: J. Cavadini
Description: 
This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism, but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines. (elective)

THEO60206: Christian Reform
Professor: U. Lehner
Description: 
Catholic theology between 1450 and 1800 is usually eclipsed in church history narratives. Yet, it was the time of the Catholic Reform with the great Carmelite mystics John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, and Jesuits like Robert Bellarmine and many others. This course will familiarize students with a rich, much neglected tradition of theology and church history. (elective)

THEO60188: Death & Resurrection in the Old Testament
Professor: M. Genung
Description:
death and resurrection are fundamental articles of the Christian faith. In the creed the Church proclaims faith in the death of Jesus and his resurrection from the dead, and for the faithful she proclaims belief in the resurrection of the body. This course will study the themes of death and resurrection in the Bible by investigating select passages, paying particular attention to Old Testament texts in which life, death, afterlife, fertility and sterility, transgression and capital punishment, blood and sacrifice, and redemption illuminate the fundamental questions of death and resurrection which are resolved in and by Jesus Christ. (elective)

THEO60462: Liturgical Theology of the Eucharist
Professor: D. Fagerberg
Description: 
This course will focus on the Eucharist as a way into liturgical theology. We will examine the historical structure and content of the Eucharistic liturgy, and from there proceed into reflecting upon various theological doctrines. That is, we will connect liturgical life with theological truths like divinization, transubstantiation, sacrifice, priesthood of baptized and ordained, eschatology, etc. We will conclude by seeing how the lex orandi of the church's Eucharist establishes the lex credendi of Church teaching, and ecclesial ministries of catechesis and evangelization. (can be taken as Sacraments - required course) (elective)

THEO60609: Christian Ethics & Pastoral Praxis
Professor: P. Odozor
Description: 
Faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and savior has practical implications for the way believers construe the world and organize their lives. What these implications are for Christian life in some specific areas of life and the tensions which arise from the attempt of the Christian community to remain faithful to the teachings of the Lord Jesus while trying to live a fully human life - this is at the core of our course. (elective)

THEO60456: Writing the Light 
Professor: G. Kordis
Description: July 5-16 - this is course is subject to be canceled if the professor cannot travel due to COVID restrictions.

The course introduces the student to the theory and practice of the art of Icon Painting, according to the Byzantine Tradition. The basic ideals and principles of the Theory of Byzantine Painting will be presented in relation to Patristic Iconology, on which the art of Iconography is founded. The main aim of the course is to introduce participants to the traditional process of painting an icon with the use of the Egg tempera technique. Students are called to make an icon during the ten class sessions of the course. (elective)