Archives » 2017

Hesburgh-King statue unveiled in South Bend

Author: Andy Fuller

University president Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., joined City of South Bend leaders including Mayor Pete Buttigieg and community members in a march from the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Center to Leighton Plaza in downtown South Bend. There, a sculpture was unveiled, based on a famous photo showing the late University president Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., holding hands with King during a 1964 civil rights rally in Chicago. Read More

In Rome, President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., discusses challenges and opportunities for Catholic Church

Author: Notre Dame News

After concelebrating Mass and meeting briefly with Pope Francis earlier in the week, University of Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., met with Archbishop Paul Gallagher, secretary for relations with states, the Vatican’s foreign minister, and discussed challenges and opportunities for the Church in countries around the world. Read More

New ID cards, other changes on the way

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Onecardlogo

Irish1Card
Beginning this summer and continuing this fall, the University will be migrating all ID cards to a new ID card that uses contactless technology. The new contactless Irish1Card will improve the security and speed of transactions across campus and increase the security of card accounts and access through data encryption. The new technology will also position the University for future technology developments and applications and will enhance operational efficiencies across campus. Read More

Lectures on the Christian Sacraments | Maxwell E. Johnson

By Allison Collins

Sacraments

Popular Patristics Series Volume 57

Greek original and English translation by Maxwell E. Johnson

Replaces Popular Patristics Series Volume 2

These six lectures on the Christian sacraments were delivered in Jerusalem in the fourth century. This was a time of rapid transition for the Church. Until AD 313, Christianity had been an illegal & persecuted religion, but under Constantine & his successors, it became the favored religion of the state. Potential converts thronged the shining new basilicas, built through the beneficence of the emperors. Catechetical instruction was needed. And it was provided by gifted preachers & teachers like St Cyril of Jerusalem.…

Read More

Theology Ph.D. candidate Craig Iffland wins Newcombe Fellowship

By Elizabeth Rankin

Craig Iffland, a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Theology, has been named a 2017 recipient of the Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. He is one of only 21 scholars from across the country to receive the award, the nation’s largest and most prestigious for Ph.D. candidates in the humanities and social sciences who are addressing questions of ethical and religious values

Read More

The Dogma of Immaculate Conception: History and Significance by Edward Dennis O'Connor C.S.C. (Editor)

By Allison Collins

Dogma

Thirteen European and American theologians treat the entire historical development and theological significance of a major Roman Catholic doctrine in The Dogma of the Immaculate Conception published (University of Notre Dame Press, 1958). Edward 0'Connor, C.S.C., has edited the 700-page volume which includes an exhaustive bibliography, a number of documents, and over fifty illustrations. A specialist in medieval theology, Father O'Connor notes in the preface that the subject of the Virgin Mary's Immaculate Conception was first discussed about the year 1100. The doctrine was defined by Pope Pius IX in 1854 after about 75 years of "what was perhaps the most prolonged and passionate debate that has ever been carried on in Catholic theology," O'Connor writes. The importance of any doctrine, however, he emphasizes, "does not lie chiefly in its history, but it its intrinsic significance as truth, and in its rank in the hierarchy of truth, which do not depend on historical contingencies." From this point of view, the Immaculate Conception is of immense importance, O'Connor observes, not only for Mariology, but also for the theology of the Redemption and of the Church. The Dogma of the Immaculate Conception is not merely a collection of miscellaneous essays on the subject. The various chapters deal with all the major aspects of the doctrine and range from "Scripture and the Immaculate Conception" to "The Immaculate Conception in Art."…

Read More

Early Mesopotamian Divination Literature: Its Organizational Framework and Generative and Paradigmatic Characteristics by Abraham Winitzer

By Allison Collins

In Early Mesopotamian Divination Literature: Its Organizational Framework and Generative and Paradigmatic Characteristics, Abraham Winitzer provides a detailed study of the Akkadian Old Babylonian (ca. 2000-1600 BC) omen collections stemming from extispicy, the most significant Mesopotamian divination technique for most of that civilization's history. Paying close attention to these texts' organizational structure, Winitzer details the mechanics responsible for their origins and development, and highlights key characteristics of a conceptual framework that helped reconfigure Mesopotamian divination into a literature in line with significant, new forms of literary expression from the same time. This literature, Winitzer concludes, represents an early form of scientific reasoning that began to appreciate the centrality of texts and textual interpretation in this civilization's production, organization, and conception of knowledge.…

Read More

Work of Love: A Theological Reconstruction of the Communion of Saints by Leonard J. DeLorenzo

By Allison Collins

Work Of Love Smaller

The saints are good company. They are the heroes of the faith who blazed new and creative paths to holiness; they are the witnesses whose testimonies echo throughout the ages in the memory of the Church. Most Christians, and particularly Catholics, are likely to have their own favorite saints, those who inspire and “speak” to believers as they pray and struggle through the challenges of their own lives. Leonard DeLorenzo’s book addresses the idea of the communion of saints, rather than individual saints, with the conviction that what makes the saints holy and what forms them into a communion is one and the same. Work of Love

Read More

Essays on Judaism in the Pre-Hellenistic Period by Joseph Blenkinsopp

By Allison Collins

Essays On Judaism

The essays deal with developments during the period from the liquidation of the Judean state to the conquests of Alexander the Great. This was a critical time in the Near East and the Mediterranean world in general. It marked the end of the great Semitic empires until the rise of Islam in the seventh century A.D.,decisive changes in religion, with appeal to a creator-deity in Deutero-Isaiah, Babylonian Marduk cult, and Zoroastrianism.For the survivors of the Babylonian conquest in a post-collapse society the issue of continuity, with different groups claiming continuity with the past and possession of the traditions, there developed a situation favourable to the emergence of sects. The most pressing question, however, was what to do faced with the overwhelming power of empire, first Babylonian, then Persian. Finally, with the extinction of the native dynasty and the entire apparatus of a nation-state, the temple became the focus and emblem of group identity.…

Read More

Ferdinand Christian Baur and the History of Early Christianity Edited by Martin Bauspiess, Christof Landmesser, and David Lincicum

By Allison Collins

Ferdinand

Translated by Peter C. Hodgson and Robert F. Brown

  • Makes a new generation of Baur scholarship available to English readers
  • Demonstrates Baur's relevance to contemporary issues in New Testament studies and historical theology
  • Focuses on the history of early Christianity
  • Discusses Baur's relation to Strauss, Mohler, and Hegel

Read More

Liquid error: No such template 'nav'