Off-Site Course Archive

Off-Site Course Archive

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Fort Wayne
Jerusalem
Tuscon
Other

Online Courses

Spring 2013 -- Online Class

 

THEO 64206 - Section 01: Patristic Exegesis (CRN 29140) - Prof. John Cavadini
Course Description:
This course will be an examination of traditions of biblical interpretation in the early Church. Since the greatest proportion of exegetical literature in the early Church was homiletic, this course will also entail an examination of traditions of preaching. We will devote considerable attention to ancient allegorical schools of interpretation (Origen), to reactions against it ("Antiochene" exegesis), and to Western exegetes (Augustine, Gregory the Great). We will also look at the uses of the Bible in ascetical literature (desert Fathers and Mothers, etc.).

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2013
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2012 -- Online Class

THEO 64167 - Section 01: Martyrs and Martyrdom (CRN 19033) - Prof. Candida Moss
Course Description: This class deals with the origins, emergence, and theology of martyrdom from its roots in Second Temple Judaism and Greco-Roman philosophy to the peace of Constantine. It will deal with (1) methodological questions such as definitions of martyrdom, identification of persecution, and the dating of texts and (2) themes in the study of martyrdom such as gender, the construction of Christian identity, readings of scripture, ideas about sacrifice and salvation, violence, and eschatology.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2012
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Spring 2012 -- Online Class

THEO 64602 - Section 01: Catholic Social Teaching (CRN 28930) - Prof. Margie Pfeil
Course Description: The purpose of this on-line course is to familiarize students with the tradition of Catholic social teaching with a view to developing skills for critical reading and appropriation of these documents. We will examine papal, conciliar, and episcopal texts from Rerum novarum (1891) up to the present time, identifying operative principles, tracing central theological, ethical, and ecclesial concerns, and locating each document in its proper historical context. Requirements: participation in discussion groups, occasional short case commentaries; 3 papers.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2012
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2011 -- Online Class

THEO 64325 - Section 01: Christianity in Africa (CRN 19567) - Paul Kollman
Course Description: Soon nearly half the world's Christians will be Africans. This course will explore the history of Christianity in Africa, beginning with the early Church but with heightened attention to the more recent growth of Christianity on the continent. We will also participate in a conference held in September here at Notre Dame, entitled "A Call to Solidarity with Africa," organized to respond to the US Catholic Bishops' letter of the same title.Particular topics to be addressed in the class include: the dynamics of missionary activity before, during, and after the colonial period; the rise of African Independent Churches; the interaction between Christianity and Islam in the past and present; Christianity in the African diaspora; and contemporary issues surrounding Christianity and the African nation-state. We will also investigate theological questions surrounding the relationship between Christianity and culture. In addition to a final exam, students will write three 5-page papers.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2011
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

 

Spring 2011 -- Online Class

THEO 64808 - Section 01: Christianity & World Religions (CRN 29353) - Prof. Brad Malkovsky
Long Title: Christianity and World Religions
Course Description: This course is designed to introduce you to the basic teachings and spiritualities of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. We will approach these religions both historically and theologically, seeking to determine where they converge and differ from Christianity on such perennial issues as death, meaning, the nature of the ultimate Mystery, the overcoming of suffering etc. That is to say, we will not only attempt to comprehend these religions according to their own self-understanding, but we will also endeavor to appraise their significance in relation to Christian faith, both in the challenge and enrichment they present. We will also examine some traditional and contemporary Catholic and Protestant approaches to the truth claims of other religions. Our own search to know how the truth and experience of other faiths are related to Christian faith will be guided by the insights of important Christian contemplatives who have entered deeply into the spirituality of other traditions. By course end we ought to have a greater understanding of what is essential to Christian faith and practice as well as a greater appreciation of the spiritual paths of others.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2011
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2010 -- Online Class

THEO 64220 - Section 01: Early Christianity (CRN 19317) - Prof. John Cavadini
Course Description: This course serves as a graduate level introduction to the theology of the early church. The emphasis is on the reading of primary sources from Ignatius and Irenaeus to Origen and the Cappadocians in the East, and Tertullian to Augustine and Gregory the Great in the West. A major focus is on the development of doctrine, both in itself and with attention to its context in the life of sacramental practice, homiletic proclamation, biblical exegesis and pastoral challenges.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2010
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Spring 2010 -- Online Class

THEO 64602 - Section 01: Catholic Social Teaching (CRN 28425) - Prof. Margie Pfeil
Course Description: The purpose of this on-line course is to familiarize students with the tradition of Catholic social teaching with a view to developing skills for critical reading and appropriation of these documents. We will examine papal, conciliar, and episcopal texts from Rerum novarum (1891) up to the present time, identifying operative principles, tracing central theological, ethical, and ecclesial concerns, and locating each document in its proper historical context. Requirements: participation in discussion groups, occasional short case commentaries; 3 papers.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2010
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2009 -- Online Class

THEO 64212 - Section 01: Eucharist in Middle Ages (CRN 19218) - Prof. Joseph Wawrykow & Sara Mata
Course Description: The Eucharist stands at the heart of western European Christianity in the high Middle Ages. The insistence of church officials on regular reception of the Eucharist; the numerous scholastic treatments of the theoretical issues associated with the Eucharist; the recourse by spiritual authors, especially women, to the Eucharist to express their most profound religious and devotional insights; the pointed reference to the Christ Eucharistically-present to establish Christian identity and to distinguish the members of Christ from others, both within and outside of western Europe; the development of new rituals focused on aspects of the Eucharist; the burgeoning of artistic representations of Eucharistic themes-all testify to the centrality of the Eucharist in medieval theological and religious consciousness. Through the close reading of representative texts by a wide variety of 13th-century authors, and, the study of the different kinds of 'Eucharistic' art, this course examines the uses made of the Eucharist by a broad spectrum of high medieval Christians. A special concern of the course is the relation between Eucharistic doctrine and religious practice-to what extent have teachings about transubstantiation and real presence shaped religious expression? How has religious experience itself occasioned the refinement of these doctrines?

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2009
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Spring 2009 -- Online Class

THEO 64206 - Section 01: Patristic Exegesis (CRN 27771) - Prof. John Cavadini
Course Description: This course will be an examination of traditions of biblical interpretation in the early Church. Since the greatest proportion of exegetical literature in the early Church was homiletic, this course will also entail an examination of traditions of preaching. We will devote considerable attention to ancient allegorical schools of interpretation (Origen), to reactions against it ("Antiochene" exegesis), and to Western exegetes (Augustine, Gregory the Great). We will also look at the uses of the Bible in ascetical literature (desert Fathers and Mothers, etc.).

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2009
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fort Wayne

Fall 2012 -- Ft. Wayne Course

THEO 64405 - Section 01: The Eucharist (CRN 19797) - Prof. Anne MCGowan
Course Description: The Church's faith is essentially a eucharistic faith, and it is especially nourished at the table of the Eucharist.?~Pope Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis 6 For nearly as long as Christian communities have gathered to share meals in memory of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, they have been reflecting on the meaning of what they are doing in response to God?s call through Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit, recognizing Jesus in the breaking of the bread. In this course, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the nature (i.e., theology) and evolution in historical forms of the Christian Eucharist, primarily through study of the structure and content of the eucharistic liturgy. The origins of the Eucharist and the historical development of eucharistic liturgies in both the East and the West will be considered first. Next, the Eucharist will be examined from a theological perspective, both in terms of how the Eucharist has been interpreted (as sacrament, sacrifice, Real Presence, etc.) and in terms of how systematic reflection on the Eucharist can inform other areas of theology (such as Christology, pneumatology, and ecclesiology). The course will conclude with a consideration of some contemporary pastoral issues affecting eucharistic celebration and the cultivation of a eucharistic spirituality, with an emphasis on the Roman Catholic tradition.This course will take place at Marian High School (Mishawaka, IN) on Sept. 14-15, Oct. 5-6, and Nov. 9-10.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2012
Campus: Fort Wayne, IN (Theo. Prog)
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2011 -- Ft. Wayne Course

THEO 64222 - Section 01: Christian Doctrine/Catechists (CRN 19568)n - Prof. John Cavadini
Course Description: This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism , but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2011
Campus: Fort Wayne, IN (Theo. Prog)
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2010 -- Ft. Wayne Course

THEO 64822 - Section 01: Doctrine of God (CRN 19576) - Shawn Colberg
Course Description: This course treats the foundational topic of Christian belief and discourse, God. Knowledge of God, gained through belief in divine revelation and its careful study, informs the very nature and content of every Christian doctrine, and so, it represents a critical ingress into Christian thought and practice. While virtually all Christians affirm the existence of a triune God who creates all that exists and forms a unique, saving relationship with human beings, such affirmations have taken form over centuries of theological reflection and debate. Further, these articles of faith inform a variety of expressions concerning God's nature and its meaning for humankind. With that in mind, this course will explore the doctrine of God from three primary vantage points: divine nature, the doctrine of the Trinity, and modern questions of belief in God. To that end, it will (1) expose students to the theological debates at the heart of these subjects of God, (2) require students to analyze the content of theological arguments for their meaning and wider impact on Christian belief; and (3) train students with methodological and interpretive tools to construct theological arguments in oral and written forms. In these ways, the course offers students the opportunity to critically investigate the doctrine of God using skills and vocabulary acquired during the semester. It aims to present theology as "faith seeking understanding" - a critical, analytic, and systematic discipline that probes and exposits God's self-revelation to humankind.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2010
Campus: Fort Wayne, IN (Theo. Prog)
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Fall 2009 -- Ft. Wayne Course

THEO 64106 - Section 01: Intro to the Old Testament (CRN 19293) - Prof. Gary Anderson
Long Title: Introduction to the Old Testament
Course Description: A basic introduction to the history and literature of ancient Israel. Close attention will be paid to the theological importance of the texts, what they meant in their original historical and canonical contexts and how they have been heard within the context of the Church.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2009
Campus: Fort Wayne, IN (Theo. Prog)
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

THEO 64403 - Section 01: Liturgical Theology (CRN 16759) - Prof. David Fagerberg
Course Description: This course will detail how Christian theology is rooted in the liturgy's lex orandi. We will begin by defining the method and scope of liturgical theology (especially using Schmemann, Kavanagh and Taft). We will then apply this to ritual form and theological questions. Looking at specific topics in liturgical theology and some of the influential authors in the liturgical movement of this century, the student will arrive at a framework for relating the liturgical life of the body of Christ with ministry that leads to and flows from it.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2009
Campus: Fort Wayne, IN (Theo. Prog)
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

THEO 64807 - Section 01: Christianity & World Religions (CRN 15337) - Prof. Brad Malkovsky
Long Title: Christianity and World Religions
Course Description: This course is designed to introduce you to the basic teachings and spiritualities of Hinduism, busshism and Islam. We will approach these religions both historically and theologically, seeking to determine where they converge and differ from Christianity on such perennial issues as death, meaning, the nature of the ultimate Mystery, the overcoming of suffering, etc. That is to say, we will not only attempt to comprehend these religions according to their own self understanding, but we will also endeavor to appraise their significance in relation to Christian faith, both in the challenge and enrichment they present. We will also examine some traditional and contemporary Catholic and Protestant approaches to the turth claims of other religions. Our own search to know how the truth and experience of other faiths are related to Christian faith will be guided by the insights of important christian contemplatives who have entered deeply into the spirituality of other traditions. By course end we ought to have a greater underestanding of what is essential to Christian fiath and practice as well as a greater appreciation of the spiritual path of others. This course is especially recommende as preparation for teaching high school and introductory university level-courses.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2009
Campus: Fort Wayne, IN (Theo. Prog)
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated
 
Jerusalem

Summer 2012 -- Jerusalem - Tantur

THEO 64208 - Section 01: Jerusalem, Desert & Galilee (CRN 4099) - Prof. Virgilio Elizondo
Long Title: Jerusalem, the Desert and Galilee: A Theological Inquiry
Course Description: This two-week course through the land of Jesus will seek to explore the theological themes of the gospel narratives informed by the socio-cultural and historical perspectives. The journey through the land organizes the theology, which is a reflection on the deeper meaning of the journey. In keeping with the tradition of the earliest followers of Jesus and of subsequent generations of Christians, by returning to the places of origins, we will seek a better understanding of the foundational words, persons, events and places mentioned in the gospels so as to probe their redemptive value for us today.

Associated Term: Summer Session 2012
Campus: Jerusalem, Israel
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Summer 2011 -- Jerusalem - Tantur

THEO 60138 - Section 01: The Fifth Gospel (CRN 4183) - Prof. Gregory Sterling
Long Title: "The Fifth Gospel": The Origins of Christianity in the Land of Israel
Course Description: Class in Tantur, Israel The land of Israel is the birthplace for Christianity. Perceptions of the relationship between the land and Christian faith have ranged from benign neglect to a consideration of Israel as "the holy land." We will examine the relationship by combining analyses of New Testament texts and visits to select sites. The course will concentrate on sites relevant to the historical Jesus, but include sites that help us understand Judaism in the first century.The course will be based at Tantur, located between Jerusalem and Bethlehem, Israel. Instruction will include both classroom experience and site visits. On most days we will have class in the morning and make excursions in the afternoon to the major sites in and around Jerusalem such as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Burnt House, Herod's Palace, and the Mount of Olives. We plan to take two longer excursions: one to Masada, the Dead Sea, and Qumran; and the other to major sites in Galilee such as Capernaum, Sepphoris, Nazareth. Students will have a couple of free days at the end of the formal course work to explore on their own.

Associated Term: Summer Session 2011
Campus: Jerusalem, Israel
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Summer 2010 -- Jerusalem - Tantur

THEO 64210 - Section 01: The Holy Land (CRN 3837) - Gabriel Reynolds
Long Title: The Holy Land (ST, HC)
Course Description: In our course "The Holy Land" we will investigate the manner in which Christians and Muslims through the centuries have understood the religious dimension of Palestine, and of Jerusalem in particular. In the first section of the course we will analyze classical religious texts, including: the New Testament prophecies of Jerusalem's destruction; the narratives surrounding Saint Helen's recovery of the true Cross and sacred relics; the traditions of Muhammad's night journey to Jerusalem, and Muslim narratives on the conquest of Palestine and the construction of the Dome of the Rock. In the second section of the course we will turn to the memories and visions of individual believers, such as the descriptions of medieval Muslim geographers, the travelogues of European Christian pilgrims, the diaries of Eastern Orthodox monks of the Palestinian desert, and the popular religious pamphlets and web sites of Muslim and Christian faithful today. Meanwhile, we will have the opportunity to travel together in the Holy Land and to visit the sites in Jerusalem and elsewhere that are central to our texts. Ultimately, students will be challenged to develop a theological response to the place of the Holy Land in Christian tradition and to the competing claims of Muslim believers.

Associated Term: Summer Session 2010
Campus: Jerusalem, Israel
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Summer 2009 -- Jerusalem - Tantur

THEO 64105 - Section 01: The Fifth Gospel (CRN 3752) - Prof. Gregory Sterling
Long Title: "The Fifth Gospel": The Origins of Christianity in the Land of Israel
Course Description: The land of Israel is the birthplace for Christianity. Perceptions of the relationship between the land and Christian faith have ranged from benign neglect to a consideration of Israel as "the holy land." This course will explore these different perceptions of the land; however, we will concentrate on a scholarly approach that takes the importance of the land seriously for understanding the historical Jesus and the emergence of Christianity. The purpose of the course is to enable participants to recreate first century Palestine and situate the major events in the life of the historical Jesus and the earliest Christian communities within that world. The course will be based at Tantur, located between Jerusalem and Bethlehem, Israel. Instruction will include both classroom sessions and site visits. On most days we will have class in the morning and make excursions in the afternoon to the major sites in and around Jerusalem and Bethlehem. For example, we will consider whether the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is the authentic site of Jesus' execution and burial and reflect on its role in the history of Christianity within the land. We plan to take three longer excursions: one to Masada, the Dead Sea, and Qumran; another to major sites in Galilee such as Capernaum, the Sea of Galilee, and Sepphoris; and yet another to Caesarea on the Mediterranean coast. The experience should transform your capacity to recreate the historical Jesus and your understanding of Christian origins.

Associated Term: Summer Session 2009
Campus: Jerusalem, Israel
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated
 
Tuscon

Spring 2013 -- Tucson

THEO 64809 - Section 01: Therese of Lisieux: Doctor (CRN 29141) - Prof. Keith Egan
Long Title: Therese of Lisieux: Doctor of the Church
Course Description: Thérèse of Lisieux was declared a doctor of the church in 1997 by Pope John Paul II. Thérèse is only the third woman so designated. The requirements for this doctorate are that one has demonstrated outstanding holiness and eminent doctrine for the universal church. This course will explore the eminent teaching of this young woman who died at age twenty four having composed a religious classic, The Story of a Soul, that has had an extraordinary readership in countless languages. The aim of this course will be to explore from theological perspectives Thérèse?s texts: Story of a Soul, her Last Conversations, her Poetry, her Plays, her Prayers and some of her selected letters. We shall investigate how this young woman anticipated several key themes of the Second Vatican Council, and we shall also explore the sources, biblical and otherwise, of her famous ?Little Way,? which has often been misread. This course will be studied in the context of the theme of the New Evangelization as featured in the Episcopal Synod of the Year of Faith (October 11, 2012?50th anniversary of the beginning of Vatican until November 24, 2013). Thérèse has long been designated the Patroness of the Missions along with Saint Francis Xavier, hence the issue of the theme of the New Evangelization.Papers for this course will be due, one at the end of February, and one at the end of March.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2013
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Spring 2012 -- Tucson

THEO 64044 - Section 01: The Sacramental Life (CRN 29595) - Prof. David Fagerberg
Long Title: The Sacramental Life: Ecclesial, Biblical, Historical
Course Description: This course will be an exploration of how Christians live a sacramental life. We will look at the sacraments from three distinct perspectives. First, we will place them within the liturgical life of the Church. Second, we will trace the biblical foundation for sacraments. Third, we will do a history of sacramental doctrine, treating the whole and then each sacrament in detail. Christianity is not primarily a set of doctrines, or a social organization, it is Christ's life lived by his disciples. The sacraments do not stand between us and Jesus like a wall, they extend from Jesus to us like a bridge.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2012
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Spring 2011 -- Tucson

THEO 64832 - Section 01: Ignatian Spirituality (CRN 29470) - Prof. Brian Daley
Course Description: "Ignatian spirituality" is a term with a wide range of meanings, but refers, at heart, to an approach to prayer and the Christian life that finds its model and inspiration in the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, the 16th-century Spaniard who founded the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits). Although they were inspired by a tradition of spiritual training and daily practice reaching back to the early Church, St. Ignatius's Exercises were forged, in their present form and wording, by his own personal experience of conversion, struggle and commitment to following Jesus; Ignatius himself saw them as an instrument for enabling would-be Christian disciples of every kind to open themselves to God's gifts of spiritual freedom and mystical union, and to make practical decisions - within that graced freedom and union - about how to shape their lives. A terse but extraordinarily powerful plan for an extended experience of prayer, the Exercises have been, since the time of their composition, an almost sacramental practice in the Church: a force that has shaped the lives of many Catholic religious groups of men and women, and of countless individuals both within and outside the Catholic community. In this course, we will begin by reflecting on Ignatius's life, personality, and spiritual journey. We will spend most of our first week on a close reading of the Exercises, and will also consider other texts of Ignatius that reveal his ideal of ministry and religious commitment, as well as his relationship with God. We will read, in addition, some contemporary chapters and articles that shed light on Ignatius's life and chief concerns. During the second week, we will turn to ways in which Ignatius's spiritual vision has taken fruitful shape in the centuries since he wrote the Exercises. We will consider the development of the Society of Jesus, as a new form of religious life that puts the Exercises into structured yet free institutional shape; the intellectual, cultural, and educational commitments that have shaped the work of Ignatian groups in the Church since the 16th century; the emphasis on the indissoluble connection between the proclamation of Christian faith and the promotion of justice in the world, which has so preoccupied Ignatian groups in the last 35 years; the practice of the "discernment of spirits," an ancient Christian approach to decision-making and vocational desires that has received a distinctive shape in the Ignatian tradition; and the ideal of "finding God in all things," which has served as the motto for the impassioned yet self-effacing "Christian worldliness" long associated with Ignatius and his companions. Our goal in the course will be to make participants more deeply aware of what Ignatian spirituality is and is not, by immersing ourselves in the main texts that embody it, and to explore the possibilities this way of seeking God and his will might open up for the life of contemporary Christians. Our hope is that a deeper familiarity with Ignatius and his spirit will inspire all of us to live our faith more intentionally and more effectively.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2011
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

 

Spring 2009 -- Tucson

THEO 60240 - Section 01: Contemplation and Action (CRN 28444) - Prof. M. James Ashley
Course Description: What is the relationship between contemplative prayer and action on behalf of others? The tendency in the Christian tradition has been to see prayer as superior to action, since it is there that one experiences, however fleetingly, that union with God that is our ultimate beatitude and destiny. However, there have been innovative attempts in the history of Christian spirituality to break down overly rigid barriers between these two essential components of the Christian life. This course will look at a cross-section of views on this question. We begin with scriptural loci for considering the relationship between prayer and action, and then move to Greek thought, with the distinction between theoria and praxis. We then consider how this conceptual pair was taken over in the history of Christian spirituality in some classic understandings of the relationship between the vita contemplativa and the vita activa. We will focus in particular on patristic and medieval homilies on Martha and Mary (Lk 10: 38-42). Figures in this section include Augustine, Bernard of Clairvaux, Thomas Aquinas, and Meister Eckhart. In the next section of the course we consider the late-Medieval and Reformation spiritualities of Catherine of Siena, Ignatius of Loyola and John of the Cross. We conclude with three contemporary figures who have attempted to interrelate contemplation and action: Thomas Merton, Dorothy Day, and Gustavo Gutiérrez.

Costs:
$1,590 for room and board (12 nights, includes meals and 24/7 beverages, coffee, tea, juices)
$1,092 tuition ($364 per credit hour)
$ Cost of travel to and from the Redemptorist Renewal Center

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2010
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated
Other

Spring 2009 -- India

THEO 64808 - Section 01: Christnty, Wrld Relgns & Libtn (CRN 28941) - Prof. Brad Malkovsky
Long Title: Christianity, World Religions, and Liberation
Course Description: The M.A. Program in Theology is offering a new course in India, called "Christianity, World Religions, and Liberation," scheduled for Dec. 28, 2008 to Jan. 14, 2009 in the city of Pune/Poona in the western state of Maharashtra. The course, offered by Prof. Bradley Malkovsky, editor of the Journal of Hindu-Christian Studies, will be taught in conjunction with some of India's best Catholic theologians, who will offer lectures in their areas of specialization. Along with introductions to the history, thought, and spirituality of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, additional topics will include Christian dialogue with other religions, Hindu-Muslim relations, Indian feminism, social liberation movements, and Indian politics. From our home base at the Jesuit-run Papal Seminary, we will make numerous field trips into Pune and beyond. These include, but are not limited to, a visit to the only Hindu seminary for women in India, where we will witness a puja-ceremony performed by women priests; a little pilgrimage to Alandi outside Pune to visit the shrine of a much revered Hindu saint; a visit to two local slums, where some of the seminarians share the life of the poor; a trip to Mumbai (Bombay) to visit the famous Haji Ali Mosque; a five hour trip north to Aurangabad where we will spend two days visiting India's most magnificent cave temples (Buddhist, Hindu, Jain) in Ajanta and Ellora (both listed as World Heritage sites). Though considerable reading is expected prior to the course, no writing is required until after the return from India. A single research paper of 15-20 pages will be due by the end of April 2009.COSTS: (1) Flight: students will pay for their flight to India independently of "in-India" course expenses. (2) Tuition: leaves $1044 for tuition (3) Room and board, travel, stipends for India professors: $850

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2009
Campus: Distributed Education
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated