Jerry Baumbach Syllabus

Catechesis: History and Theory 

Prof. Gerard F. Baumbach

University of Notre Dame
 

June 17-July 5, 2013    12:20 pm to 3:00 pm     MTWRF (except July 4)

Office: 326 Geddes Hall (574 631-2894)    Email: Baumbach.2@nd.edu


Course Description
Catechesis aims “‘to put people not only in touch but in communion, in intimacy, with Jesus Christ’” (National Directory for Catechesis 19B, quoting Catechesi Tradendae 5; cf. General Directory for Catechesis 80). What is catechesis and how does catechesis pursue this aim in contemporary parish life? What are some dimensions of the Church’s understanding of catechesis during selected periods in its history (e.g., influence of the baptismal catechumenate)? This course will enable students to explore catechesis from selected historical and contemporary perspectives, to gain awareness of developments in practice and in theoretical approaches, and to acquire and demonstrate a working familiarity with contemporary catechetical literature. Readings will include a variety of sources from antiquity to the present. Students will be encouraged to apply these sources to issues in parish catechetical leadership today. 

Course Objectives     

1. To explore catechesis at selected periods in the history of the Church.

2. To gain awareness of developments in catechetical practice and in theoretical approaches.

3. To acquire and demonstrate a working familiarity with contemporary catechetical literature.

4. To apply sources consulted to issues in parish catechetical leadership today.

Required Reading     
National Directory for Catechesis (NDC).United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Washington, DC:  
    USCCB, 2005. Read as assigned in Syllabus Plan.

Yarnold, Edward. The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation: The Origins of the R.C.I.A. Collegeville, MN: The     
    Liturgical Press, 1994. Includes parts of baptismal homilies of Cyril of Jerusalem, Ambrose of Milan, John
    Chrysostom, and Theodore of Mopsuestia. See Chapter 1 for exploring the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults
    in relation to fourth century practice. Also see Day 4 and Day 5 of Syllabus Plan.

Required Course Packet Readings that are identified in this Syllabus Plan. The Course Packet can be purchased
    at the Copy Center at 301 O’Shaughnessy Hall (8:00 am to 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday).

Recommended Reading: Not Required for This Course
General Directory for Catechesis (GDC). Congregation for the Clergy. USCC—Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1997.
Burgess, Harold W. Models of Religious Education: Theory and Practice in Historical and Contemporary
    Perspective.
Nappanee, IN: Evangel Publishing House, 2001.

Recommended Course Packet Readings for further enrichment that are identified in this Syllabus Plan. One
    Recommended Reading is not in the course packet but appears below with the designation “Web only”
    (Wuerl: “Disciples of the Lord”).

Educational Processes
Planned are group discussions, class presentations by students, use of media, handouts, and other interactive processes. A lecture format also will be utilized. Through study of topics both historical and contemporary, we will determine together linkages between the experience of ages past and people’s catechetical experience today.

Class sessions often will include a combination of catechetical history and an exploration of a selected chapter (or parts of chapters) of the National Directory for Catechesis and/or other readings. Woven throughout the course will be the presentation and discussion of catechetical theories/approaches (ordinarily in relation to a particular era). We will also examine catechetical materials.

Assignments

Papers and class presentations will be evaluated on the basis of insight, organization, content, and style. It is preferred but not required that papers be submitted as an email attachment (but not pdf). Papers should be double-spaced, 12-point type, and paginated and include your name on the first page. Keep a copy of each written assignment. Late assignments will be accepted only with prior arrangement and a serious excuse.
 

Course Requirements

  1. Attend all sessions, read required readings prior to class, and participate in class discussions/presentations.
     
  2. Prepare a 5-page reflection paper on (a) your understanding of catechesis, (b) its essential role in developing a vibrant parish community, and (c) how catechesis might benefit from your commitment to faith and the Church. Be sure to address all three parts.  Due: June 24.
     
  3. Present an 8 to 10 minute reading report: Present to the class insights about one article from the Course Packet (Required or Recommended) on the day indicated for that article in the Syllabus. Ask yourself: (a) What is the article’s primary focus? (b) What have I gained from reading it? Note: No more than two students per day.
    Also, articles by Burghardt (Days 4, 6) and Bryce (Days 8, 9) are split between two days; if you select either of these authors you are responsible only for the portion of the article assigned for the day you select. The web-only article listed in the Syllabus (but which is not in the Course Packet) may also be used for this assignment.
     
  4. Present a 15 minute small group review of catechetical material: With two partners, select catechetical texts and corresponding teaching guides from a single catechetical series. As a group, choose one or more chapters for your review. This exercise is not intended to be an exhaustive analysis; you can divide up the review any way you like. Report to the class, using the following questions as a guide:
  • Are we able to see a “process of learning and teaching”? (Hint: look for on-page “labels.”)
  • What other elements enable students, catechists, and families to focus on core theme(s)?
  • What surprises, encourages, or raises questions for us? What should others know about this material?

     Note: Materials and a sign-out sheet are in the Institute for Church Life Library (320 Geddes Hall (available
     from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday to Friday). Due: Groups will split between June 25-26.
 

  1. Select ONE of the following options in consultation with the instructor. 

a. Prepare a 5-page report on one of the following. Give one or more reasons for your choice. As you
              prepare, think about what you would want catechists to know. Due: July 1.

  • An issue or era in the history of catechesis
  • A catechetical methodology
  • Catechesis and its relation to one or more of the following: evangelization, liturgy, inculturation, Catholic social teaching
  • A numbered section of the National Directory for Catechesis             

b. Prepare a 5-page report on your ideas for enriching parish catechesis. Explain efforts with which you
    are familiar or share a dream of what you may someday hope to do. Indicate how the six tasks of
    catechesis influence your ideas and identify some resources that might support your approach. Due: July 1.

c. Prepare a 5-page report on your reading of the mystagogical work of one of the following from Yarnold’s
    book: Cyril of Jerusalem, Ambrose of Milan, John Chrysostom, or Theodore of Mopsuestia. Identify three
    points and explain how you would relate them to catechesis for adults today (e.g., Cyril tells the newly-
    baptized they “are images of Christ” [3:1]. What connections do you see for catechesis and Christian
    discipleship in contemporary life?). Due: July 1.  

d. By yourself or with a partner, present an oral report, not to exceed 15 minutes, on topic 5a, 5b, or 5c.
   
No separate written report is required. Due: Presentations will be divided between July 1 and July 2.

6.   Final Exam: This will be an individual oral exam on the final day of class. Exam date: July 5.

7.   Self-assessment: Your assessment of your contribution to large and small group discussions and exercises,
      and your faithfulness in coming to class prepared. Due: July 5.
 

DUE DATES SUMMARY

              Requirement

                                     Date Due

Grade Weight

1.  Attendance, reading, participation

Ongoing

15

2.  Reflection Paper

June 24 (Monday)

15

3.  Course Packet Reading Report  (Oral)

The day the reading appears in the Syllabus

15

4.  Small Group Review of Catechetical
     Material (Oral)

Groups will split between June 25 (Tuesday) and June 26 (Wednesday)

10

5.  Report (Paper or Oral)

July 1 (Monday) for paper
July 1-2 (Monday or Tuesday) for oral presentation

20

6.  Final Exam (Oral)

July 5 (Friday)

20

7.  Self-Assessment

July 5 (Friday)

5

SYLLABUS PLAN

National Directory for Catechesis (NDC) references in parentheses refer to numbered text sections.

     See pages 6-7 of this Syllabus for complete reference information for Course Packet entries.

Week 1: June 17-21, 2013
 

NDC focus: Introduction and Chapters 1, 2, 3
 

DAY 1, Monday, June 17

 

Required Reading

 

 

 

 

DAY 2, Tuesday, June 18

 

Required

 

 

 

 

DAY 3, Wednesday, June 19

 

Required

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

 

DAY 4, Thursday, June 20

 

Required

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

DAY 5, Friday, June 21

 

Required

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

Course Overview

 

Marthaler. “Vatican II: A New Meaning of Catechesis.”     

Mulhall. “A Brief Walk through the National Directory for Catechesis.”

NDC Introduction (1-8)   

 

 

Dimensions of an Emerging Catechetical Quest

 

Nolan. “Events of Grace: Seven Moments in the History of Catechesis.”

Baumbach. “The Field That Is the World: Catechesis in a Pluralistic Society.”

NDC Ch. 1 Proclaiming the Gospel in the United States (9-14)
    highlight: proclaiming faith within cultural diversity

 

 

Catechesis in the Early Church

 

The Didache. James A. Kleist (Trans.).

NDC Ch. 2 Catechesis within the Church’s Mission of Evangelization (15-22)
    highlights: catechesis and evangelization; tasks of catechesis

 

 

McCarron. “Liturgy, Christian Living, and Catechesis: Insights from the Didache.

Wuerl. “Disciples of the Lord: Sharing the Vision (A Pastoral Letter on the New Evangelization).”        
   Web only: http://site.adw.org/pdfs/ADW_PastoralNewE_Eng.pdf

 

 

Movement toward Mystagogy

 

Burghardt. “Catechetics in the Early Church: Program and Psychology” (pp. 51-55 for today).

Yarnold. The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation; read the work of one of the four preachers
    from this book for today and DAY 5.

NDC Ch. 2 (continued) Catechesis within the Church’s Mission of Evangelization (15-22)
    highlight: inculturation of Gospel

 

Regan. “The Early History of Mystagogy.”

Soto. “At the Crossroads of Faith and Culture.”

 

The Ongoing Catechetical Quest and the Experience of Mystagogy

 

Yarnold. The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation; read the work of one of the four preachers
    from this book for today (i.e., from the same person you chose for DAY 4).

NDC Ch. 3 This Is Our Faith; This Is the Faith of the Church (23-26)
    highlights: catechetical authenticity, “symphony of the faith” (NDC 24)

 

Johnson. “Christian Initiation.”

Office for the Catechism, USCCB. “The Catechism of the Catholic Church and the General
    Directory for Catechesis: Complimentary yet Distinct Forms of Catechetical Writing.”

 


 

SYLLABUS PLAN

 

 

National Directory for Catechesis (NDC) references in parentheses refer to numbered text sections.

    See pages 6-7 of this Syllabus for complete reference information for Course Packet entries.

 

Week 2: June 24-June 28, 2013

 

                                                            NDC focus: Chapters 4, 10, 7, 8

 

 

 

DAY 6, Monday, June 24

 

Required

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

DAY 7, Tuesday, June 25

 

Required

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

 

DAY 8, Wednesday, June 26

 

Required

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

DAY 9, Thursday, June 27

 

Required

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►


 

DAY 10, Friday, June 28

 

Required

 

 

Recommended ►

 

The Ongoing Catechetical Quest; Augustine’s Classic Approach

 

Augustine. The First Catechetical Instruction (Part One). Joseph P. Christopher (Trans.).

Burghardt. “Catechetics in the Early Church: Program and Psychology” (pp. 56-60 for today).

(continued) NDC Ch. 3 This Is Our Faith; This Is the Faith of the Church (23-26)
    highlights: catechetical authenticity, “symphony of the faith” (NDC 24)

     

Turner: “The Role of the Catechist: Augustine’s Catechizing Beginners.”

 

 

Spanning the 5th to 15th centuries

 

Clark. “Medieval Catechetics and the First Catechisms.”

NDC Ch. 4 Divine and Human Methodology (27-31) and Ch. 10 Resources for Catechesis

    (66-71); highlight: methodological foundations

 

Funk. “Benedictine Spirituality and the Search for Meaning in a Postmodern World.”

Penzenstadler, Joan. “Contemplation and Education: Making Connections.”

 

 

16th Century Onward: Fracture in the Community’s Experience (Reformation & Response)

 

Bryce. “Evolution of Catechesis from the Catholic Reformation to the Present” (pp. 142-150).

NDC Ch. 4 and Ch. 10 (continued)
 

 

Power. “Highlights in the History of Religious Education: 1600-1750.”

Garvin. “Women and Ignatian Spirituality: New Horizons for Persons in Ministry.”

 

Approaching and into the 20th Century

 

Bryce. “Evolution of Catechesis from the Catholic Reformation to the Present” (pp. 150--157).

NDC Ch. 7 Catechizing the People of God in Diverse Settings (47-52); highlight: catechesis
    for all

NDC Ch. 8 Those Who Catechize (53-56); highlight: roles and formation in catechesis

 

Sloyan. “Developments in Religious Education Since 1800: A Summary and a Hope.”

 

 

Approaching and into the 20th Century  (continued)

 

Hofinger. “Looking Backward and Forward: Journey of Catechesis.”

Summarizing NDC Ch. 4 Divine and Human Methodology (27-31); Ch. 10 Resources for
   Catechesis
(66-71)

 

Mongoven. “The Story of Renewal.”

Ruff. “From Kerygma to Catechesis: Josef A. Jungmann’s Good News Yesterday and Today.”

 

 

SYLLABUS PLAN

 

National Directory for Catechesis (NDC) references in parentheses refer to numbered text sections.

     See pages 6-7 of this Syllabus for complete reference information for Course Packet entries.

 

 

  Week 3: July 1-3, 2013 and July 5, 2013

 

                                                     NDC focus: Chapters 9, 5, 6 and Conclusion
 

 

 

DAY 11, Monday, July 1

 

Required

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 


 

DAY 12, Tuesday, July 2

 

Required

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

 

 

DAY 13, Wednesday, July 3

 

Required

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended ►

 

 

Thursday, July 4

 

 

 

DAY 14, Friday, July 5

 

Catechesis Bridging a Millennium; Vatican II
 

Baumbach. "Catechesis since the Second Vatican Council: An Incomplete Reflection (Pt. 1)."

Baumbach. "Catechesis since the Second Vatican Council: An Incomplete Reflection (Pt. 2)."


NDC Ch. 9 Organizing Catechetical Ministry (57-65; see especially 60-61)

    highlight: diocesan and parish organization for catechesis 

 

 

Dooley. “Evangelization and Catechesis: Partners in the New Millennium.”



 

Liturgical-Catechetical Aspects for Enlivening Catechesis; Mystagogy Rediscovered

 

Dooley. “Liturgy: Source for Catechesis.”                          
Baumbach. “Eucharistic Mystagogy.”
Also available on Web at http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/how-we-teach/catechetical-ministry/catechetical-sunday/eucharist/upload/catsun-2011-doc-baumbach-mystagogy.pdf

NDC Ch. 5 Catechesis in a Worshiping Community (32-39; see especially 32-35, 37)

    highlights: liturgy, life, and catechesis: shaping a transforming catechesis

 

 

Baumbach. “The Baptismal Catechumenate: Inspiration for Catechesis.”

 

 

 

 

The Call to Catechetical Leadership

 

Baumbach. “What Will Tomorrow Bring for Catechesis and Catechetical Leadership?”

Rosenhauer. “Catechesis and the Catholic Social Mission.”

NDC Ch. 6 Catechesis for Life in Christ (40-46); Conclusion (72-74) 
    highlight: Catholic social teaching

 


Loftus. “Leadership: Not the Same As Management.”

 

 

HOLIDAY

 

 

 

Final Examination (Oral) in 326 Geddes Hall

 

 

 


 

Course Packet Readings

Required Readings are in bold type. One Recommended Reading (Wuerl: “Disciples of the Lord”) is identified below as “Web only.” It is not in the Course Packet but is listed here in the order in which it appears in the Syllabus.

 

Marthaler, Berard. “A New Meaning of Catechesis.” NCCL Catechetical Leadership, Vol. 14, No. 3  

    (Summer 2002): 5-6, 14.                                                    

 

Mulhall, Daniel S. “A Brief Walk through the National Directory for Catechesis.” Catechetical Leader,
    Vol. 16, No. 2 (March 2005): 4-5, 18-21.                                                                             

 

Nolan, Lucinda A. “Events of Grace: Seven Moments in the History of Catechesis.” Catechetical
    Leader
, Vol. 20, No. 2 (March/April 2009): 8-9, 18-19.

 

Baumbach, Gerard F. “The Field That Is the World: Catechesis in a Pluralistic Society.” Catechetical
    Leader (Catechetical Update)
, Vol. 19, No. 1 (January/February 2008): U5-U8.

 

Kleist, James A. (Trans.). The Didache. New York: Newman Press; Paulist Press, 1948 (© by Johannes
    Quasten and Joseph C. Plumpe), pp. 3-25; Notes: pp. 151-166.                                         

 

McCarron, Richard E. “Liturgy, Christian Living, and Catechesis: Insights from the Didache.” The Living
    Light
, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Fall 2002): 6-16.                                                                                            

 

Wuerl, Donald W. “Disciples of the Lord: Sharing the Vision (A Pastoral Letter on the New Evangelization),”
    Most Reverend Donald W. Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington, August 23, 2010.
    Web only: http://site.adw.org/pdfs/ADW_PastoralNewE_Eng.pdf

 

Burghardt, Walter J. “Catechetics in the Early Church: Program and Psychology.” The Living Light.
   
Vol. 1, No. 3 (Fall 1964): 100-118.                                                                                                 

 

Regan, David. “The Early History of Mystagogy.” In David Regan, Experience the Mystery: Pastoral
    Possibilities for Christian Mystagogy.
Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1994, pp. 11-26.  

 

Soto, Jaime. “At the Crossroads of Faith and Culture.” Catechetical Leader, Vol. 21, No. 4
    (July/August 2010): 4-7.

 

Johnson, Maxwell E. “Christian Initiation.” In Susan Ashbrook Harvey and David G. Hunter (Eds.), The
    Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies
. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008, pp. 693-710.

                                                  

Office for the Catechism, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. The Catechism of the Catholic
    Church and the General
Directory for Catechesis: Complimentary yet Distinct Forms of Catechetical
    Writing
. Catechism Update (Summer 1998); 2 pages.

 

Christopher, Joseph P. (Trans.). St. Augustine: The First Catechetical Instruction (Part One). New York/ 
    Mahwah, NJ: Newman Press (Paulist Press), 1946 (date of Imprimatur), pp. 13-51; Notes: pp. 93-120.         

 

Turner, Paul. “The Role of the Catechist: Augustine’s Catechizing Beginners.” The Living Light, Vol. 39,
    No. 1 (Fall 2002): 17-23.

 

Clark, Aubert. “Medieval Catechetics and the First Catechisms.” The Living Light. Vol. 1, No. 4
    (Winter 1965): 92-107.                                                                                                      
                    

 

Funk, Mary Margaret. “Benedictine Spirituality and the Search for Meaning in a Postmodern World.” PACE
   
(Professional Approaches for Christian Educators), Vol. 25 (November 1995): 10-14.                 

 

Penzenstadler, Joan. “Contemplation and Education: Making Connections.” PACE (Professional Approaches
    for Christian Educators), Vol. 24 (November 1994): 26-29.    

Bryce, Mary Charles. “Evolution of Catechesis from the Catholic Reformation to the Present.” In John
    H. Westerhoff III and O.C. Edwards, Jr. (Eds.), A Faithful Church: Issues in the History of Catechesis.
   
Wilton, CT: Morehouse-Barlow Co., Inc., 1981, pp. 204-235.                                      

 

Power, Edward J. “Highlights in the History of Religious Education: 1600-1750.” The Living Light.
   
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 1965): 106-121.                                                                                

 

Garvin, Mary. “Women and Ignatian Spirituality: New Horizons for Persons in Ministry.” PACE (Professional
    Approaches for Christian Educators), Vol. 25 (February 1996): 15-19.                                         

 

Sloyan, Gerard S. “Developments in Religious Education Since 1800: A Summary and Hope.” The Living Light,  
    Vol. 2, No. 4 (Winter 1965-66): 82-97.                                                                  

 

Hofinger, Johannes. “Looking Backward and Forward: Journey of Catechesis.” The Living Light,
    Vol. 20, No. 4 (June 1984): 348-357.                                                                                                          

 

Mongoven, Anne Marie. “The Story of Renewal.” In Anne Marie Mongoven, The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis.
    New York: Paulist Press, 2000, pp. 36-63; Notes: pp. 287-291.

 

Ruff, Daniel. “From Kerygma to Catechesis: Josef A. Jungmann’s Good News Yesterday and Today.” The Living
    Light
, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Fall 2002): 62-73.                                                                

 

Baumbach, Gerard F. “Catechesis since the Second Vatican Council: An Incomplete Reflection (Part One)."
   Catechetical Leader, September, 2012, vol. 23, no. 5: 15-22.

 

Baumbach, Gerard F. “Catechesis since the Second Vatican Council: An Incomplete Reflection (Part Two)."    
   Catechetical Leader, November, 2012, vol. 23, no. 6: 15-20.

 

Dooley, Catherine. “Evangelization and Catechesis: Partners in the New Millennium.” In Catherine Dooley
    and Mary Collins (Eds.), The Echo Within: Emerging Issues in Religious Education. Allen, TX: Thomas
    More, 1997, pp. 145-159.                                                                           

 

Dooley, Kate. “Liturgy: Source for Catechesis.” Catechetical Leader (Catechetical Update), Vol. 16, No. 1
    (January 2005): U1-U5.                                                                                                    


Baumbach, Gerard F. “Eucharistic Mystagogy.” Catechetical Sunday Article (September 18, 2011).
    Washington, DC: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011, pp. 1-9. Also available on Web at
http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/how-we-teach/catechetical-ministry/catechetical-sunday/eucharist/upload/catsun-2011-doc-baumbach-mystagogy.pdf

 

Baumbach, Gerard F. “The Baptismal Catechumenate: Inspiration for Catechesis.” Antiphon, Vol. 7,
    No. 3 (2002): 21-28.                                                                                                                       

 

Baumbach, Gerard F. “What Will Tomorrow Bring for Catechesis and Catechetical Leadership?”
    Momentum, Vol. 36, No. 3 (September/October 2005): 32-35.    

 

Rosenhauer, Joan. “Catechesis and the Catholic Social Mission.” Catechetical Leader, Vol. 16, No. 4
    (July 2005): 6-7, 26-29.

 

Loftus, David. “Leadership: Not the Same as Management.” Catechetical Leader, Vol. 19, No. 1
    (January/February 2010): 8-10, 20.